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Frog life cycles…Forest School style!

The tadpoles in our pond are growing quickly…we noticed that their bodies were much fatter than when we looked last week! We scooped a few out of the pond, to have a closer look at…

Outside, we started off our very rainy session with a fun game of ‘tadpoles beware!’ We talked about which animals might try to eat the tadpoles, and decided thar cats and birds would be our ‘predators’ for the game. Everyone wriggled and pretended to swim around like tadpoles…but as soon as they heard a ‘miaow’ or ‘tweet-tweet’, the children had to quickly hide on a ‘lilly pad’ (a tyre or hoop) before the cat or bird caught them. We all had great fun playing this game, using good listening skills and helping one another to escape and keep safe.

Then we thought about what we already knew about frogs…and decided where to stand along the knowledge line. Everyone chose where to stand…depending on whether they could tell us 1-2 frog facts, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 or an impressive 9-10 things about frogs.

Next we listened to and learnt lots of things about frogs! We learnt that they are amphibians (meaning they live on land and in water) we learnt what they like to eat, their life cycle, how they move and lots more. Then we worked in 3 groups, to produce a picture on the ground of either frogspawn, a tadpole or a frog. The discussions, creativity and results were brilliant! Look at what Beeches made…

The frogspawn was made with lots of stones, gathered and placed carefully by this group. They completed it by adding little spots of mud onto the middle of the stones, to represent to eggs inside the spawn.

 

This wonderful tadpole was made by first drawing an outline in the ground with a stick, and then lining the outside of the shape with sticks, before filling the middle with leaves. Perfect!

Lastly, the frog! It started off with a green belly, then was given a lovely big body, four legs and big bulging eyes. We were very impressed with how well Beeches worked (and cooperated with one another) on this task.

We also had LOTS of fun jumping through this big muddy puddle, pretending to be a frog! Some of us didn’t mind getting¬† just a little bit splashed!!

At the end of the morning, we thought about how much we’d learnt, and allowed the children to decide whereabouts on the knowledge line they now were. It was great to see that all they recognised that they had moved up the line and that they could now tell us a little bit more about frogs.

 

 

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